9 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms, Ultrasound, Belly, Tips Fetal 2021

9 Weeks Pregnant

9 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms, Ultrasound, Belly, Tips Fetal 2021

The end of the embryo period

Would you believe your baby is only an embryo for one more week and is already developing into a fetus? He’s now about 1 inch long, the size of a medium green olive — but no martinis, please.

The head has straightened out and is more fully developed and the ears are continuing to grow, making baby look more human. Plus, toes are visible, and all of baby’s essential organs, like the heart, brain, kidneys, liver and lungs, have begun to develop.

The arms and legs in your soon-to-be-fetus are also spontaneously moving now that minuscule muscles are beginning to develop, though you won’t feel your tiny dancer for at least another month or two.

9 weeks pregnant is how many months?

If you’re 9 weeks pregnant, you’re in month 3 of your pregnancy. Only 6 months left to go! Still, have questions? Here’s some more information on how weeks, months, and trimesters are broken down in pregnancy.

Baby’s heartbeat is audible on ultrasound

While it’s way too early to feel anything, it’s not too early to possibly hear something. Your baby’s heart is developed enough — and has grown large enough — for its beats to be heard with a Doppler, a handheld ultrasound device that amplifies the lub-dub sound the heart makes.

But don’t worry if your practitioner can’t pick up the sound of your baby’s heartbeat yet. It just means your shy guy is hiding in the corner of your uterus or has his back facing out, making it hard for the Doppler to find its target. In a few weeks, or at your next visit, that miraculous sound is certain to be audible for your listening pleasure.

Your Body at Week 9

9 weeks pregnant woman

Feeling so tired!

When it comes to pregnancy symptoms, you may feel like you’ve already reached your limit at 9 weeks pregnant: Your clothes are getting tighter around the waist, you’re busting out on top and you’re still running to the bathroom 100 times a day — and if it isn’t because you’re sick, it’s to pee.

But wait, there’s more. You’re having trouble lifting your head off the pillow, you’re dragging your feet all day and you can’t wait to crawl into bed as soon as you arrive home at night.

Sound familiar? Extreme pregnancy fatigue is a common symptom, especially in the first trimester. And for good reason: Making a baby is hard work. Your body is working overtime preparing for motherhood as it develops the placenta, your baby’s lifeline.

What’s more, your body’s metabolism and hormone levels have increased significantly, which triggers a decrease in blood sugar and blood pressure — a recipe for fatigue. Try these tips to combat fatigue safely during pregnancy.

The good news: Relief is around the corner as your energy level increases and morning sickness decreases over the next few weeks, once placenta construction is completed in the second trimester.

The not-so-good news: Tiredness is likely to reappear during the third trimester as the demands of toting around a larger fetus increase. But since staying active is important for your health (and your baby’s!), try these tips to work out when you’re tired during pregnancy.

Snacking well

Dealing with nausea and vomiting during pregnancy isn’t easy — but it’s especially hard when you’re anxious to start feeding yourself and your baby. Don’t worry. As challenged as your appetite is right now, it’s still up to the challenge of filling your baby’s nutritional needs.

In the meantime, if big meals are a big turnoff, eat at least six smaller, but nutrient-packed mini-meals and snacks throughout the day. Not only will the mini-meals be easier on your queasy stomach, but keeping your tummy a little bit filled is the best way to keep it from emptying out over the toilet.

Right now, focus on foods you find less offensive, like whole-grain crackers paired with slices of mild cheddar. And don’t forget to tap into the soothing power of ginger!

Baby Wrap
Baby Wrap

By 9 weeks pregnant, you might be starting to feel like a veteran in morning sickness, and some of your early symptoms might be at their peak. This is due to the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at its highest levels.

If you’re feeling extra moody and fatigued, or have more breast tenderness, nausea, heartburn, or constipation, trust us, you’re not alone!

Let’s talk about all that’s happening to you at 9 weeks pregnant.

9 weeks pregnant: What to expect

  • Your early pregnancy symptoms are likely at their peak in severity.
  • You might start experiencing food cravings and aversions, and your moods may be unpredictable.
  • Your baby is growing: Major organs are developing as are arms, toes, eyelids, and ears.
  • It may be possible for the heartbeat to be detected on a handheld Doppler ultrasound.
  • You’ll want to keep your healthcare team informed of anything out of the ordinary and seek help for your symptoms (including any concerns about your mental health).

9 week pregnancy overview

At 9 weeks, you probably won’t appear pregnant to other people, but you may notice changes in your body. Those early pregnancy symptoms are really ramping up.

Depending on your size before pregnancy, your clothes may start to feel tighter due to your thickening waistline or hormone-induced bloating.

Your breasts continue to grow fuller and your nipples darker. As your blood volume increases in order to carry nutrition to your baby, you may notice that your veins are more prominent.

Your baby

Your baby is now about 3/4-inch long at the 9-week mark — about the size of a grape or an olive. It’s an exciting time for baby: Major organs continue developing, arms are growing, and elbows can bend. Tiny toes develop and the ears and eyelids that began emerging a week ago continue to form.

Your baby is becoming more active, although it’s too soon for you to feel the motion. It may be possible for the heartbeat to be detected on a handheld Doppler ultrasound.

Twin development at week 9

You may discover that you’re carrying twins (or more!) if you have an ultrasound this week. This can be exciting but does require some additional care and discussion with your healthcare providers.

Some women carrying multiples may have more intense pregnancy symptoms than women who are only carrying one baby and may have a higher likelihood of complications. Talk to your doctor about the risks of the following:

  • anemia
  • gestational diabetes
  • preeclampsia
  • preterm labor
  • cholestasis of pregnancy
  • intrauterine growth restriction, or delayed fetal growth
  • twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, which occurs when one baby gets more blood than the other baby
  • vaginal bleeding

Speak with your doctor if you have severe morning sickness, as that can be a sign of hyperemesis gravidarum. This causes severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.

9 weeks pregnant symptoms

Symptoms you’ve experienced so far in your pregnancy are likely to continue and even intensify this week. Your body is really ramping up all the hard work around week 9.

These symptoms include:

  • nausea or vomiting
  • frequent urination
  • tender or tingly breasts
  • fatigue
  • dizziness
  • irritability or unexpected emotions
  • heartburn or constipation
  • food aversions or cravings
  • increased hunger

It’s not fun, we know, but a lot of these symptoms will ease soon enough. Hang in there.

To combat these symptoms, try the following:

  • Wear a maternity bra to relieve sore breasts. A sports bra may also help. Find maternity bras online.
  • Drink plenty of water and eat high-fiber foods to combat constipation and provide fullness.
  • Stand up slowly, don’t skip meals, and avoid standing in place too long to help prevent dizziness.
  • Eat several small meals a day and avoid greasy and spicy foods to help prevent heartburn and nausea.
  • Eat salty crackers or dry toast before getting out of bed, suck on ice chips or a tart lozenge, or try bland, easy-to-digest small meals to combat morning sickness. Shop for lozenges online.
  • Avoid caffeine and take bathroom breaks as needed to cope with frequent urination.

Things to do this week for a healthy pregnancy

We hope you’ve been receiving prenatal care already, but if not, now is the time. You’ll want to talk about continued good nutrition and activity and your doctor can look for anything out of the ordinary.

It may be difficult to eat due to morning sickness, but it’s important that you try to eat protein- and carbohydrate-rich foods or snacks when you can. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated, especially if you’re experiencing morning sickness with vomiting.

If you smoke or use any nicotine products, try to stop. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source, smoking during pregnancy causes an increased risk of a variety of issues, including:

  • miscarriage
  • placenta problems
  • premature birth
  • low birth weight
  • sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • venous thromboembolism (VTE) (blood clot risk can also be increased by smoking)
  • heart defects, cleft lip or palate, and other birth abnormalities

9 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms, Ultrasound, Belly, Tips Fetal 2021

Quitting smoking is never easy, but it’s well worth it for you and your growing little one. If you need help to stop smoking, talk to your doctor about starting a smoking cessation program.

One of the best things you can do for your baby at this stage in your pregnancy is to follow a healthy and balanced eating plan. Here are some tips for noshing on the good stuff:

  • Avoid eating undercooked meat, fish, or eggs. and Avoid all deli meats.
  • Avoid high mercury fish such as swordfish, shark, and king mackerel. Low mercury fish is healthy and can be eaten up to three times per week Trusted Source.
  • Wash all fruits and vegetables before eating.
  • Keep cutting boards and dishes clean.
  • Drink no more than one to two caffeinated drinks per day.
  • Follow your doctor’s recommendations for all supplements including folic acid.
  • Take a prenatal vitamin with DHA and EPA as recommended by your doctor. Shop for prenatal vitamins that contain DHA and EPA online.
  • Don’t drink alcohol. There is no safe amount trusted Source of alcohol when pregnant, as it may cause miscarriage, stillbirth, or fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) in your child.

When to call the doctor

Much of what you’re going through is perfectly normal, but when things feel off, you’ll want to get in touch with your healthcare providers. Call your doctor if any of the following symptoms occur during the first trimester:

A call to your doctor is in order if your morning sickness is severe or causes any of these symptoms:

  • weight loss
  • vomiting three or more times a day with the inability to keep food or water down
  • vomiting blood
  • fainting
  • dizziness
  • decreased urination
  • rapid heartbeat
  • frequent headaches
  • fruity mouth or body odor
  • confusion or disorientation

Takeaway

Week 9 of your pregnancy may not feel much different than week 8. But your baby is almost fully developed in miniature, and ready to continue growing.

The decisions you make to take care of yourself and your baby at this early stage will help to support a healthy pregnancy later. It’s time to get excited and keep making great choices for you and baby!

What should I be feeling at 9 weeks pregnant? Early pregnancy symptoms (at 9 weeks)

extreme tiredness. nausea – find out about morning sickness remedies. mood swings. a metallic taste in your mouth.

Can you show me at 9 weeks pregnant? 9 Weeks Pregnant Belly

Your uterus is expanding to accommodate your growing fetus. In fact, it has doubled in size! You may even be showing a bit at 9 weeks. Your uterus will begin to grow out of your pelvis in the coming weeks.

How common is miscarriage after 9 weeks?

Results: One case was lost to follow-up. The risk of miscarriage among the entire cohort was 11 of 696 (1.6%). The risk fell rapidly with advancing gestation; 9.4% at 6 (completed) weeks of gestation, 4.2% at 7 weeks, 1.5% at 8 weeks, 0.5% at 9 weeks, and 0.7% at 10 weeks (chi(2); test for trend P=. 001).

9 Weeks Pregnant
9 Weeks Pregnant

Why is Week 9 of pregnancy the worst?

The exact peak of morning sickness is different for every woman, but it will generally be around week 9. Cornell University researchers believe that symptoms peak when the baby’s organ development is most vulnerable to chemicals. This happens between week 6 and week 18 of pregnancy.

Week 9 of Your Pregnancy The first two months of pregnancy are behind you. At 9 weeks pregnant, morning sickness is peaking, and you may be dealing with mood swings, heartburn, and other pregnancy symptoms. Meanwhile, your baby is growing, looking more human, and even moving around.

When it comes to pregnancy symptoms, you may feel like you’ve already reached your limit at 9 weeks pregnant: Your clothes are getting tighter Baby You about the size of a peanut. The head is more erect, the neck is more developed Mom-to-be

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